A Guide to “Ghosts”

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This list represents all current vacancies in the Minnesota Orchestra, including a few musicians whose departures occurred years before the lockout began. Some of these departing musicians were never replaced because of MOA’s reluctance and occasional outright refusal to schedule auditions to replace them.

Associate Concertmaster: Sarah Kwak, resigned, now with Oregon Symphony

Assistant Concertmaster: Stephanie Arado, resigned

1st Violin: Vali Philips, resigned, now with Oregon Symphony

1st Violin: Peter McGuire, leave of absence, now with Tonhalle Orchester of Zurich

1st Violin: Chou-hei Min, retired

Principal 2nd Violin: Gina DiBello, resigned, now with Chicago Symphony

Assistant Principal 2nd Violin: Julie Ayer, retired

2nd Violin: Yun-Ting Lee, never offered a contract despite winning audition, now with Cleveland Orchestra

2nd Violin: Edward Stack, retired

2nd Violin: David Wright, retired

2nd Violin: Kristin Kemper, resigned

Principal Viola: Thomas Turner, leave of absence, San Diego Symphony

Viola: Matt Young, resigned, now with San Francisco Symphony

Viola: Ken Freed, leave of absence, now residing in Seattle

Viola: Ben Ullery, resigned, now with Los Angeles Philharmonic

Viola: Gareth Zehngut, never offered a contract despite winning audition, now with San Diego Symphony

Associate Principal Cello: Janet Horvath, resigned for medical reasons

Cello: Mina Fisher, resigned for medical reasons

Principal Bass: Peter Lloyd, resigned many years ago, position never filled

Associate Principal Bass: Fora Baltacigil, resigned, now with New York Philharmonic

Principal Oboe: Basil Reeve, retired

Principal Clarinet: Burt Hara, now with the Los Angeles Philharmonic

Second Clarinet: David Pharris, leave of absence, Houston Symphony

Principal Horn: Mike Gast, leave of absence, New York Philharmonic

Second Trumpet: Bob Dorer, leave of absence, National Symphony Orchestra.

Bass Trombone: David Herring, resigned

Piano/Harpsichord: Vladimir Levitski, retired many years ago, position never filled

Assistant principal Librarian: Jennifer Johnson, resigned four years ago, now with Metropolitan Opera, position never filled

12 thoughts on “A Guide to “Ghosts”

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  3. Does a leave of absence mean Burt Hara could return? I’ve noticed this in program listings in the past, but seems no one listed as such ever returns.

    • Thank you for your concern. Yes, a leave of absence means that a player has until spring to decide if he would like to return. In the past some musicians have decided to return and others have made their departures permanent. In this case, Burt Hara will have to weigh his position in the LA Philharmonic against what the Minnesota Orchestra’s future prospects look like at that point. We are fighting to retain a premiere orchestra. If he decides to remain in LA, it will be a terrible loss for Minnesota.

  4. I find the behavior of the Minnesota Orchestra management to be an appalling example for the rest of the nation. They are treating their musicians like the lowest commodity rather than as the highest and most precious. They had a great ensemble made up of great people and produced a spectacular product, garnering praise all over the world. It will take years, if not decades to rebuild what mis-management has destroyed. Yes, there are many fantastic young musicians graduating from conservatories and universities, but they are mostly jewels in the raw uncut state. The musicians that have walked away from the MSO were refined gems that fit perfectly in the larger setting. They can be replaced with substitutes or temporary employees, but the chances that they will fit as well as the former are very slim. It is very sad that the management doesn’t recognize what Minnesota has lost, or indeed, what the world now lacks; a musical work of art.

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  6. As the daughter of former principal trumpet Charles Schlueter I have been observing this unacceptable and appalling situation from abroad since it began last year. I had not known about the number of orchestra members who have resigned, retired, or gone on leave until I saw the link to this site in today’s New Times article regarding your plight. I hope that a satisfying solution can be found, and soon…

  7. Pingback: Minnesota Orchestra Musicians: Let Them Play! | Giocosity

  8. I was second trpt. in Chicago during 1950 until 1962 when I got moved
    to 4TH IN FALL OF 1962–1963
    IN 1962 WE PLAYED ALEZ NEVSKY IN WHICH THERE IS A 3 NOTE SOLO FOR WHICH FRITZ REINER GAVE ME A SOLO BOW AT THE END
    WHICH I ACCEPTED.. WOW A SOLO BOW FOR THE 2nd TRPT.
    SO THAT MAY I WENT UP TO ASK FOR A RAISE.
    AND A 4th TRPT CONTRACT WAS OFFERED TO ME
    SO I WAS FORCED TO PLAY 4th
    THE ORCH. MEMBERS GAVE ME A CHECK FOR 140.OO
    TO COMPANSATE ME FOR MY LOSS OF THE POSITION
    IN 1963 WE ALLRAN FOR UNION OFFICES
    AND OVERWHELMED OURSELVES AND WON
    20 POSITIONS AND PETRILLO WAS OUT!!!!!!!
    THEN WE BEGAN ICSOM AND SENZA SORDINO
    NOW TODAY????????????
    WHO OWNS THE MINN. SYMPHONY?????????????
    TEN BOARD MEMBERS—— OR THE CITIZENS
    OF MINNEAPPOLIS
    SHOULD’NT THERE BE MORE CITIZENS ON THE BOARD
    AND ALSO MUSICIANS
    ALL CONTRIBUTING TO THEIR SYMPHONY
    GIVE THIS IDEA SOME CONSIDERATIONS
    THEN SEND ME A FARWELL AND TELL ME TO SHUT UP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  9. At the center of the problem is our refurbished Orchestra Hall and the projected 6 million dollar annual deficit. The governor has weighed in as well as the mayor of Minneapolis. There is a simple solution and the politicians can produce it. Sell Orchestra Hall to the City/County and or State for about $100 million. Lease the hall back to the orchestra at a nominal amount. Add the $100 million to the endowment. Surely our financial bank manager geniuses can get a return of 6 to 7%.
    (After all most anyone can get that rate on investment quality corporate bonds at current rates, and the orchestral association pays no tax.) A government that can pay for sports facilities for four professional big league teams, not to mention the University teams, can surely afford to support one of the greatest cultural assets the state has to offer its citizens. The state/5 county area/ and or the city could pay with a modest sales tax increment—or electronic pull tabs?

    And the Board might even sell seat licenses! Believe it or not I would pay for a seat license for my Friday night full season row 9 seats 101 and 102!

  10. Pingback: Gloves come off as orchestra musicians mark one year locked out of their jobs – Union Advocate

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